Installing PgAdmin3 1.8.0 with Gentoo Linux

Today, my quest for the latest and greatest software has led me to a new release of PgAdmin3. The Gentoo ebuilds for the project are terribly out of date. Before setting out to install the new version of this software, I decided I better figure out why it hasn’t been added to the official Gentoo portage tree.

The new version of PgAdmin requires wxGTK-2.8.*. There is a request for enhancement open already. The reason it hasn’t been closed is that there were a lot of packages that depended on anything greater that wxGTK-2.6 when they were added to portage. Those had to be fixed before a new wxGTK could be added because the newer wxGTK is not compatible. There is also a request for a newer PgAdmin that is marked that it will be resolved later.

Now, moving on to overcoming all this and getting the software right now. Continue reading “Installing PgAdmin3 1.8.0 with Gentoo Linux”

Upgrading to Xorg-X11 7.3 with ati-drivers 8.42.3 on Gentoo

I’m a sucker for bleeding edge technology. After posting before about upgrading to the 8.42.3 ati drivers, I realized I was using Xorg-X11 7.2, not 7.3, which is the latest. The latest 7.3 ebuild contains a block on the ati drivers. The block is no longer necessary though because the 8.42.3 drivers are compatible and have xorg-server 1.4 support built in.

Here is what I did to upgrade. Continue reading “Upgrading to Xorg-X11 7.3 with ati-drivers 8.42.3 on Gentoo”

The perennially late Gentoo gnome-light ebuilds

If you run Gentoo Linux for your desktop, and you happen to favor the Gnome desktop environment, you may have noticed the incredible number of packages that need to be installed in order to install the gnome ebuild. The ability to pick and choose just those components you need for a system is one of the reasons I personally haven’t switched away from Gentoo to another Linux distribution. This ebuild however, seems to me to go somewhat against the original intent of the OS.

Continue reading “The perennially late Gentoo gnome-light ebuilds”

Upgrading an OLD Gentoo Machine.

I’m in the process of re-installing a pretty old machine with the latest Gentoo. I’ve got a shared NFS directory with portage and all my machines are using a packages directory. After one machine builds something, another machine can simply install the built package.

Here is a portion of the make.conf on each machine.
FEATURES="-distlocks buildpkg"
PKGDIR="/usr/portage/packages/x86"

Well, this particular machine was installed with Glibc 2.3.x. I typed the following to do the upgrade:
emerge -auDvk system
About 1/3 of the way through the upgrade, tar suddenly stopped working:
tar: /lib/libc.so.6: version `GLIBC_2.4' not found (required by tar)
I realized that tar had been upgraded but the glibc was not yet upgraded. To fix the problem, I created a new version of tar on a different system:
USE="static" emerge -av tar # on another machine
scp :/bin/tar /bin/ # from the broken machine.

Off I go, things are working.

One way to unemerge lots of unneeded packages on Gentoo Linux

As part of a recent project, I had installed a lot of packages on a separate machine to test my configuration. As is common, with Gentoo, you want to run the following before you actually emerge anything:
emerge -p <package_name>
In this particular case, I noticed the dependency list was pretty long (50 packages to be exact). Instead of going ahead with the emerge, I first recorded the package list to a file for later reference:
emerge -p <package_name> --nospinner > dep.list
Now that I’m done with the project, I can clean up the packages I no longer need like this:
emerge -aC `cat dep.list | grep 'ebuild N' | cut -d ' ' -f 8`
Notice the grep. That is because a couple of the packages were simply upgraded and I don’t know that they aren’t needed. After a quick scan of the resulting list to see what is going to be uninstalled, I let emerge do the rest of the work.

Walla, no more 50 extra packages on that machine.